Read these Swimming Safety Tips Before Your Big Cannonball

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I don’t ever remember not knowing how to swim.  Growing up in Florida, it is a rite of passage because you are surrounded by water.  My mother taught me how to swim as a baby at the Pompano Beach community pool.  I spent every summer at the community pool and I was even featured in the local newspaper on my diving skills.  I think at one point I wanted to be a professional synchronized swimmer and of course my outfit would be hot pink with a yellow swim cap.

Putting all the fun aside about the joys of swimming, I believe it is important that you know how to swim because of the dangers that come along in traumatic accidents.  Basic swimming knowledge could help you from drowning.  The statistics are alarming, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, “every day, about ten people die from unintentional drowning. Of these, two are children aged 14 or younger. Drowning ranks fifth among the leading causes of unintentional injury death in the United States.”   I believe it is important to understand the basic principles of swimming because it could save your life.  It doesn’t matter if you are an adult or child; it is never too late to learn.  It amazes me the amount of the children left unsupervised at public pools and private pools like hotels.  I always find myself, not enjoying my time in the pool because I’m paying attention to the kids in the pool.

In Alabama, we have access to water as well, by way of the lakes, streams, ocean, and pools.  According to Healthline, here are suggestions on “drowning prevention and water safety”.

  1. Fence off pools and entrances to bodies of water
  2. Invest in swimming lessons
  3. Always supervise children in water
  4. Keep inflatables handy
  5. Don’t mix swimming and alcohol
  6. Learn CPR

Also, be sure you know all the various swimming styles and strokes.  Be sure to look below for those helpful tips and more.

(Source) For more from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, click here.  For more from Healthline, click here.