We are closely monitoring a storm system that could enter our area Tuesday night into Wednesday morning that brings the threat of severe weather. The storm system comes “out of the west with enough moisture warmth shear and instability for severe weather out ahead of it,” said The Weather Channel.

James Spann, ABC 33/40, and Townsquare Media Tuscaloosa Chief Meteorologist said that “severe thunderstorms are likely over the Lower Mississippi River Valley Tuesday; there is an “enhanced risk” (level 3/5) from near Memphis to Monroe, LA.”

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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For the Yellowhammer State, the “highest risk of severe storms in Alabama Tuesday night will be over the far western counties of the state, where a “marginal risk” (level 1/5) has been defined,” said Spann.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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The National Weather Service in Birmingham said that "a storm system will eject across the Midwest and Great Lakes regions driving a cold front through the Deep South. This system will produce a low-end risk for severe storms late Tuesday night into Wednesday morning as the front passes across Central Alabama."

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National Weather Service in Birmingham Highlights

Where

Western and southern portions of Central Alabama.

When

11 p.m. Tuesday - 11 a.m. Wednesday

Threats

Isolated damaging winds up to 60 mph

A tornado

Heavy rainfall may result in localized flooding.

National Weather Service
National Weather Service
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(Source) Click here to follow the Facebook Page for James Spann. For more details from the National Weather Service Birmingham, click here. For more information from The Weather Channel, click here. 

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